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European ASP.NET Core Hosting - HostForLIFE.eu :: How to Find and Use ASP.NET Core Session

clock February 24, 2017 06:41 by author Scott

I'm building a tutorial (hopefully soon to be a post) and in that tutorial I needed to use Session for some quick-and-dirty data storage. Unfortunately when I tried to use Session in my default project, it was nowhere to be found, and I was sent down a small rabbit hole trying to find it. This post will walk through a reminder of what Session is, where to find it in ASP.NET Core 1.0, an overview of the new extension methods available, and building our own custom extension method. Let's get started!

What is Session?

If you're just starting to develop in ASP.NET, you may not have encountered Session before. Session is a serialized collection of objects that are related to the current user's session. The values are usually stored on the local server memory, but there are alternate architectures where the values can be stored in a SQL database or other distributed storage solutions, especially when your servers are part of a server farm.

You can store any data you like in Session, however any data you store will only be available to the current user as long as the session is active. This means that if that user logs out, the Session data is lost; if you need to keep this data you have to find another way to store it.

Finding the Session

ASP.NET Core 1.0 has been written from the ground up to be a modular, choose-what-you-need framework. What this means is that you must explicitly include any packages you want to use in your project.

This allows us developers to maintain tight control over what functionality our ASP.NET Core projects actually need, and exclude anything that is not necessary.

In our case, Session is considered to be one of these "additional" packages. In order to include that package we need to add a reference to Microsoft.AspNet.Session in the project.json file. If we wanted to use memory as our caching backend, we would also include Microsoft.Extensions.Caching.Memory.

Once we've got the package included in our project, we need to make it available to the Services layer by modifying the ConfigureServices()method in the Startup file, like so:

public void ConfigureServices(IServiceCollection services) 
{
    ...
    services.AddMemoryCache();
    services.AddSession(options =>
    {
        options.IdleTimeout = TimeSpan.FromMinutes(60);
        options.CookieName = ".MyCoreApp";
    });
    ...
}

With all of these steps completed, you can now use Session in your projects just like in any other ASP.NET application. If you wanted to use a different cache backend (rather than memory) you could grab a different NuGet package like Redis or SqlServer. Don't forget to check NuGet if you can't find the functionality you need; it is probably there and you just need to download it.

How to Use Session

ASP.NET Core 1.0 has introduced some new extension methods that we can use for accessing and storing Session values. The odd thing is that these extensions are not in Microsoft.AspNet.Session; rather, they are in Microsoft.AspNet.Http, and so we will need to add that package.

Once we've got that package included, we can start using the extension methods:

[HttpGet]
public IActionResult Index() 
{
    var userID = Context.Session.GetInt("UserID");
    var userName = Context.Session.GetString("UserName");
    return View();
}

[HttpGet]
public IActionResult Default() 
{
    Context.Session.SetInt("UserID", 5);
    Context.Session.SetString("UserName", "John Smith");
    return View();
}

The new extension methods are:

  • Get: Returns a byte array for the specified Session object.
  • GetInt: Returns an integer value for the specified Session object.
  • GetString: Returns a string value for the specified Session object.
  • Set: Sets a byte array for the specified Session object.
  • SetInt: Sets an integer value for the specified Session object.
  • SetString: Sets a string value for the specified Session object.

Why do only these extensions exist, and not GetDouble, GetDateTime, etc? I'm really not sure. If I had to guess I'd say it is to ensure that the values are serializable, but don't quote me on that. If anybody knows the real reason, I'd love to hear it!

Creating Extension Methods

I'm not completely satisfied with these extensions; they don't have enough functionality for my tastes, and so I'm gonna build some more. Specifically, I want to build extensions that will store a DateTime in session and retrieve it.

Here's the method signatures for these extensions:

public static DateTime? GetDateTime(this ISessionCollection collection, string key) 
{

}

public static void SetDateTime(this ISessionCollection collection, string key, DateTime value) 
{

}

The ISessionCollection interface is exactly what it sounds like: a collection of items stored in Session.

Let's tackle the SetDateTime() method first. DateTimes are weird because they are not inherently serializable, but they can be converted to a serializable type: long. So, we must convert the given DateTime value to a long before it can be stored.

public static void SetDateTime(this ISessionCollection collection, string key, DateTime value) 
{
    collection.Set(key, BitConverter.GetBytes(value.Ticks));
}

The BitConverter class allows us to convert byte arrays into other types easily.

Now we can tackle the GetDateTime() method. There are two things we need to keep in mind when building this extension. First, it is entirely possible that there will be no value in Session for the specified key; if this happens, we should return null. Second, we are storing the DateTime as a long, and therefore we need to serialize it back into a DateTime type; luckily the DateTime constructor makes this really easy. The final code for the method looks like this:

public static DateTime? GetDateTime(this ISessionCollection collection, string key) 
{
    var data = collection.Get(key);
    if(data == null)
    {
        return null;
    }

    long dateInt = BitConverter.ToInt64(data, 0);
    return new DateTime(dateInt);
}

Now we can use these extensions in addition to the ones already defined.

Now we've seen Session in action, including what package to use from NuGet, what extension methods are available, and even how to build our own extension method. Let me know if this helped you out in the comments!

Happy Coding!



ASP.NET Core 1.1 Hosting - HostForLIFE.eu :: Use Distinct And FirstOrDefault Clauses In .NET Using linq.js

clock February 22, 2017 10:12 by author Peter

In this version, I will tell you about using Let us see how to use Distinct() and FirstOrDefault() clauses with the help of linq.js in .NET Web Application. It's useful to write simple LINQ queries from Entityframework to client side with LinqJS.

It’s better for validating data at the client side.
Improves performance of the application.

Let’s see one by one,
Distinct() function is different here.

C#.NET Code
    var FirstNameCollection = myDataArray.Select(x => x.FirstName).Distinct(); 
LinqJS Code
    // Retrieves non-duplicate FirstName values. 
    var FirstNameCollection = Enumerable.From(myDataArray).Distinct(function(x) { 
        return x.FirstName; 
    }).Select(function(FName) { 
        return FName; 
    }).ToArray(); 
The FirstOrDefault() function is nearly similar.

C#.NET Code
    public class cmbMonthOfWeek { 
        public string cmbMonth { 
            get; 
            set; 
        } 
        public int Id { 
            get; 
            set; 
        } 
    } 
    List < cmbMonthOfWeek > weekInfo = new List < cmbMonthOfWeek > (); 
    weekInfo.Add(new cmbMonthOfWeek { 
        cmbMonth = "First week", Id = 0 
    }); 
    weekInfo.Add(new cmbMonthOfWeek { 
        cmbMonth = "Second week", Id = 1 
    }); 
    weekInfo.Add(new cmbMonthOfWeek { 
        cmbMonth = "Third week", Id = 2 
    }); 
    weekInfo.Add(new cmbMonthOfWeek { 
        cmbMonth = "Fourth week", Id = 3 
    }); 
    var defaultWeekData = (from p in weekInfo where p.Id == 1 select p).FirstOrDefault();
Note

Here in defaultWeekData, you will get cmbMonth = "Second week".

LinqJS Code
    $scope.cmbMonthOfWeek = [{ 
        "cmbMonth": "First week", 
        "Id": 0 
    }, { 
        "cmbMonth": "Second week", 
        "Id": 1 
    }, { 
        "cmbMonth": "Third week", 
        "Id": 2 
    }, { 
        "cmbMonth": "Fourth week", 
        "Id": 3 
    }, ]; 
    var defaultWeekData = Enumerable.From($scope.cmbMonthOfWeek).Where(function(x) { 
        return x.Id == 1 
    }).FirstOrDefault();  Distinct And FirstOrDefault Clauses In .NET Using linq.js

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European ASP.NET Core Hosting - HostForLIFE.eu :: Customising model-binding conventions in ASP.NET Core

clock February 21, 2017 08:04 by author Scott

A pattern I use when building Web APIs is to create commands to represent an API operation and models to represent resources or results. We share these "common" objects with our .NET client so we can be sure we're using the same parameters names/types.

Here's an excerpt from Fabrik's API for creating a project:

public HttpResponseMessage Post(int siteId, AddProjectCommand command)
{
    var project = new CMS.Domain.Project(
        session.GetSiteId(siteId),
        command.Title,
        command.Slug,
        command.Summary,
        command.ContentType,
        command.Content,
        command.Template,
        command.Tags,
        command.Published,
        command.Private);

    session.Store(project);

    var model = CreateProjectModel(project);
    var link = Url.Link(RouteNames.DefaultRoute, new { controller = "projects", siteId = siteId, id = project.Id.ToIntId() });

    return Created(model, new Uri(link));
}

We also use commands for GET operations that have multiple parameters such as search endpoints. So instead of:

public IActionResult GetProjects(string searchTerm = null, int page = 1, int pageSize = 10)
{

}

We have a GetProjectsCommand:

public class GetProjectsCommand
{
    public string SearchTerm { get; set; }
    [MinValue(1, ErrorMessage = "Page must be greater than 0.")]
    public int Page { get; set; } = 1;
    public int PageSize { get; set; } = 20;
}

This provides a single place to encapsulate our default values and validation rules, keeping our controllers nice and lean.

Model-binding in ASP.NET Core MVC

To bind complex types to query strings in ASP.NET Web API we had to change the parameter binding rules. This is because the default was to bind complex types from the HTTP Request body.

When implementing the above pattern in ASP.NET Core I was pleasantly surprised to see that the following worked out of the box:

// GET: api/values
[HttpGet]
public IEnumerable<string> Get(GetValuesCommand command)
{

}

I thought that perhaps the framework detected that this was a HTTP GET request and therefore bound the parameter values from the query string instead.

Actually this is not the case - in ASP.NET Core, complex types are not bound from the request body by default. Instead you have to opt-in to body-based binding with the FromBodyAttribute:

// POST api/values
[HttpPost]
public void Post([FromBody]AddValueCommand command)
{
}

This seems an odd default given that (in my experience) binding complex types from the request body is far more common.

In any case, we can customise the default model-binding behaviour by providing a convention:

public class CommandParameterBindingConvention : IActionModelConvention
{
    public void Apply(ActionModel action)
    {
        if (action == null)
        {
            throw new ArgumentNullException(nameof(action));
        }

        foreach (var parameter in action.Parameters)
        {
            if (typeof(ICommand).IsAssignableFrom((parameter.ParameterInfo.ParameterType)))
            {
                parameter.BindingInfo = parameter.BindingInfo ?? new BindingInfo();
                parameter.BindingInfo.BindingSource = BindingSource.Body;
            }
        }
    }
}

Which is registered like so:

public void ConfigureServices(IServiceCollection services)
{
    services.AddMvc(options =>
    {
        options.Conventions.Add(new CommandParameterBindingConvention());
    });
}

This convention checks to see if the parameter type implements ICommand (a marker interface I created) and if so, instructs the framework to bind the values for this parameter from the request body.

All I have to do then is update my command with this interface:

public class AddValueCommand : ICommand
{
    public string Value { get; set; }
}

Then I can drop the unnecessary [FromBody] attribute:

// POST api/values
[HttpPost]
public void Post(AddValueCommand command)
{
}

 



European ASP.NET Core Hosting - HostForLIFE.eu :: How to Setup Webpack in ASP.NET Core

clock February 10, 2017 11:11 by author Scott

Webpack is a great tool for bundling the client side assets in your web application. In this post we'll briefly discuss why you should create bundles and see how Webpack can automate that for us in ASP.NET Core.

Why should I bundle

When building web applications, regardless of the server side framework, you'll need to get your client side resources over to the browser. You may have dozens of JavaScript and CSS files in your project but having to reference each of them individually in your HTML markup is just not ideal for production deployments.

Each browser only allows so many concurrent requests per hostname. BrowserScope has some data on this that you can view on their site. If your web application makes more than the allowed number of simultaneous requests then the additional requests will end up being queued. This leads to longer load times and a not so smooth experience for your users; especially on mobile devices.

It would be much better to group resources into bundles so that the browser would have fewer files to download and thus fewer requests to make. This will help in keeping bandwidth usage low and even with battery life on your users' devices.

What is Webpack?

Webpack is a module bundler for the static assets in your web application. Essentially, you point Webpack at the main entry point(s) of your code then it will determine the dependencies, run transformations and create bundles that you can provide to your browser. What's even better is that in addition to JavaScript Webpack can also handle CSS, LESS, TypeScript, CoffeeScript, images, web fonts and more.

Setting up

We're going to start by setting up a new ASP.NET Core project using the dotnet cli tooling. If you don't have tooling installed, you can find can setup files and instructions here. If you're not a Windows user, the tooling works on Windows, OSX and Linux so no need to worry.

Let's get started by opening a terminal and creating an empty directory. Now, we'll generate a new ASP.NET Core project by running the following command:

dotnet new -t web 

Currently, the generated project includes .bowerrc and bower.json files. You can delete these since we'll be using NPM to install packages. If you don't have NodeJS installed on your system, make sure you do so before continuing.

The next thing we'll do is create a folder called Scripts in the root of your project. You'll find out why later on. Also add an empty webpack.config.js to the root of your project. As you might have guessed, this is the file we'll use to configure Webpack. Your project layout should look something like this.

Configuring Webpack

Before we start configuring Webpack, let's check out where our assets actually are. ASP.NET Core places all the files destined for the browser inside of the wwwroot folder by default. If you take a peep inside that folder, you'll see sub folders for your your JavaScript, CSS and image files. Note, the names of these sub folders aren't important. Feel free to rename them if you wish.

Personally, I prefer to reserve the wwwroot folder for the bundles that I want to provide to the browser. What we'll do is use the Scripts directory that was created earlier for the working files that will get included in the bundles.

Let's add two pretty trivial JavaScript files to our Scripts folder.

//other.js
function func() {
    alert('loaded!');
}
module.exports = func;

//main.js
var other = require('./other');

other();

Our scripts have been written using the CommonJS module syntax. The main.js file imports other.jsand calls the exported function. Ok, simple enough. Let's take a look at webpack.config.js.

var path = require('path');

module.exports = {
    entry: {
        main: './Scripts/main'
    },
    output: {
       publicPath: "/js/",
       path: path.join(__dirname, '/wwwroot/js/'),
       filename: 'main.build.js'
    }
};

The webpack.config.js file is a CommonJS module that we'll use to setup Webpack. The sample above shows a fairly bare bones Webpack configuration. Inside of entry, we define a main module and point it to the location of main.js file since that's where our app starts. The name of the bundle can be changed to something else if you like. There's no requirement for it to be called main. Inside of output, we let Webpack know what to name the bundle file and where to place it. The publicPath property configures the relative URL that the browser will use to reference our bundles.

Alright, that's good for now. Before we generate our bundle, make sure you have Webpack installed globally on your machine. Type the following command in your terminal. You'll only have to do this once.

npm i -g webpack 

Now we're ready to create our bundle. Make sure your terminal path is at the root of your project directory. Now run

webpack 

Your terminal output should look similar to below.

In your code editor, open Views/_Layout.cshtml. Near the bottom of the file, add a script reference to our bundle.

<script src="~/js/main.build.js"></script>

The generated ASP.NET Core template adds a few scripts tags wrapped in environment tag helpers. Go ahead and remove these for now.

<environment names="Development">
        <script src="~/lib/jquery/dist/jquery.js"></script>
        <script src="~/lib/bootstrap/dist/js/bootstrap.js"></script>
        <script src="~/js/site.js" asp-append-version="true"></script>
</environment>

Finally, we can run our application and see if our bundle works. Execute the following commands in the command terminal.

dotnet restore
dotnet run

Navigate to http://localhost:5000 in your browser. If everything works as expected, you should see an alert with loaded! in the browser window.

Tying the builds together

We can reduce the number of commands we have to type by leveraging the build events in project.json. Update the scripts section to include the precompile event. To see the other available events, head over to the .NET Core Tools docs.

"scripts": {
    "precompile": ["webpack"],
  },

Now running dotnet run or dotnet build will also run Webpack to generate the bundle.

Conclusion

In this post, we got a short introduction to setting up Webpack in ASP.NET Core. Webpack often gets labeled as overly complex and difficult to setup. Hopefully, this post showed you how easy it is to get started and made you a little more curious about what else it can do.



European ASP.NET Core Hosting - HostForLIFE.eu :: Cookie Authentication and Policy Based Authorization in ASP.NET Core

clock February 6, 2017 10:23 by author Scott

This is the first part of the series of articles I'll be covering about ASP.NET Core Security. We're going to start off with cookie based authentication and build our way up to configuring policy based authorization.

As part of the ASP.NET Core security, there is a new richer policy based authorization that we can use to authorize against the claims in user's possession.

Let's build an example MVC application to demonstrate the concepts. In our scenario, we'll demand users to be authenticated and have Read claim to view the home page of our application.

I am using Visual Studio 2015 Pro Edition w/Update 3 (you should also be able to use the free community edition).

1. Create a new ASP.NET Core Web Application


2. Select the Empty Template


3. We need to add the required nuget packages to configure authorization, cookie authentication, and the mvc middleware. Bring up the project.jsonfile, add the following under the dependencies section.

"Microsoft.AspNetCore.Authorization": "1.0.0"
"Microsoft.AspNetCore.Authentication.Cookies": "1.0.0"
"Microsoft.AspNetCore.Mvc": "1.0.0"


4. Once you save the project.json file, Notice Visual Studio installs the missing nuget packages automatically. Next, bring up the Startup.cs where we'll configure the middleware we just included in our project.

5. In Configure method, add the following authentication middleware configuration;

app.UseCookieAuthentication(new CookieAuthenticationOptions
    {
        AuthenticationScheme = "Cookies",
        LoginPath = new StringPath("/Account/Login"),
        AccessDeniedPath = new StringPath("/Home/Forbidden"),
        AutomaticAuthenticate = true,
        AutomaticChallenge = true
    });

Here we're using the Cookie authentication, defining our LoginPath, where users will be redirected for authentication, and AccessDeniedPath when the user is not authorized. AutomaticAuthenticate flag indicates that the middleware should run on every request and attempt to validate and reconstruct any serialized principal it created. AutomaticChallenge flag indicates that the middleware should redirect the browser to the LoginPath or the AccessDeniedPath when the authorization fails (there are various other configuration options, however this the bare minimum we need for this example).

Next, we'll configure the requirements for the ReadPolicy. The policy will demand the user to be authenticated and have the Read claim in order access the required resource(s). Depending on your authorization logic, you can setup your policy to require additional claims.

public void ConfigureServices(IServiceCollection services) 
{
    services.AddAuthorization(options =>
    {
        options.AddPolicy("ReadPolicy", policyBuilder =>
        {
            policyBuilder.RequireAuthenticatedUser()
                .RequireAssertion(context => context.User.HasClaim("Read", "true"))
                .Build();
        });
    });
}

6. Finally we need to add the mvc middleware configuration.

app.UseMvc(builder =>
    {
        builder.MapRoute("default", "{controller=Home}/{action=index}/{id?}");
    });

Let's add couple of controllers so that we can test the login and the policy we've created. Create AccountController for user login and HomeController where we'll apply the ReadPolicy.

7. In the AccountController.cs add the following actions to login user;

[HttpGet]
public IActionResult Login(string returnUrl) 
{
    ViewData["ReturnUrl"] = returnUrl;
    return View();
}

8. Add a simple Login.cshtml view under the Views/Account folder (create the folder structure if it doesn't exists) where the user can login to the application.

<form asp-action="Account/Login" method="post" 
      asp-route-returnUrl="@ViewData["ReturnUrl"]">
    <div>
        <label>Username</label>
        <input type="text" name="username" />
    </div>
    <div>
        <label>Password</label>
        <input type="password" name="password" />
    </div>
    <div><button>Login</button></div>
</form> 

In the POST login action, we have a simple verification; The username and the password must match in order to authenticate the user (Obviously you wouldn't do this in a real production application but for our demo purposes this is fine). If they match, we then create a set of claims, the claims identity, and the claims principle that represents the authenticated user. Then, we sign in the user (means we issue a cookie to the user which contains the set of claims we've created) and redirect back to the resource that was requested for access.

[HttpPost]
public async Task<IActionResult> Login(string username, string password, string returnUrl) 
{
    if (username == password)
    {
        var claims = new List<Claim>
        {
            new Claim("Read", "true"),
            new Claim(ClaimTypes.Name, "ayayalar"),
            new Claim(ClaimTypes.Sid, "12345")
        };

        var claimsIdentity = new ClaimsIdentity(claims, "password");
        var claimsPrinciple = new ClaimsPrincipal(claimsIdentity);

        await HttpContext.Authentication.SignInAsync("Cookies", claimsPrinciple);

        if (Url.IsLocalUrl(returnUrl))
        {
            return Redirect(returnUrl);
        }

        return Redirect("~/");
    }

    return View();
}

9. Add the following action to the HomeController.cs;

[Authorize(Policy = "ReadPolicy")]
public IActionResult Index() 
{
    return View();
}

Note that we passed the ReadPolicy to the authorization attribute. The user must be authenticated and have a Read claim to have access. Otherwise, they'll be forwarded to the Forbidden page as we specified in the authentication middleware configuration.

The Index.cshtml view for the home page (can be as simple as one line of code) under Views/Home folder;

<h1>Access Granted</h1>

We should be able to test our changes at this point. Once you run the application, you'll be redirected to the login page since you're not authenticated (notice the return url in the query string is set automatically by the framework). Upon successfully submitting your credentials, you will be authorized and redirected to the home page.

For testing purposes, try removing the Read claim we've added in the Loginaction, rebuild your solution and restart the application, even if the user can login successfully, authorization will be denied and the user will be redirected to the Forbidden page.



HostForLIFE.eu Proudly Launches Umbraco 7.5.7 Hosting

clock January 27, 2017 07:16 by author Peter

HostForLIFE.eu, a leading Windows web hosting provider with innovative technology solutions and a dedicated professional services team, today announced the support for Umbraco 7.5.7 hosting plan due to high demand of Umbraco users in Europe. The company has managed to build a strong client base in a very short period of time. It is known for offering ultra-fast, fully-managed and secured services in the competitive market.

 

HostForLIFE.eu hosts its servers in top class data centers that is located in Amsterdam, (NL), London, (UK), Washington, D.C. (US), Paris, (France), Frankfurt, (Germany), Chennai, (India), Milan, (Italy), Toronto, (Canada) and São Paulo, (Brazil) to guarantee 99.9% network uptime. All data centers feature redundancies in network connectivity, power, HVAC, security and fire suppression. All hosting plans from HostForLIFE.eu include 24×7 support and 30 days money back guarantee. HostForLIFE Umbraco hosting plan starts from just as low as €3.49/month only and this plan has supported ASP.NET Core 1.1, ASP.NET MVC 5/6 and SQL Server 2012/2014/2016.

Umbraco is a fully-featured open source content management system with the flexibility to run anything from small campaign or brochure sites right through to complex applications for Fortune 500's and some of the largest media sites in the world. Umbraco is strongly supported by both an active and welcoming community of users around the world, and backed up by a rock-solid commercial organization providing professional support and tools. Umbraco can be used in its free, open-source format with the additional option of professional tools and support if required.

Umbraco release that exemplifies our mission to continue to make Umbraco a bit simpler every day. The other change is that there's now a "ValidatingRequest" event you can hook into. This event allows you to "massage" any of the requests to ImageProcessor to your own liking. So if you'd want to never allow any requests to change BackgroundColor, you can cancel that from the event. Similarly if you have a predefined set of crops that are allowed, you could make sure that no other crop sizes will be processed than those ones you have defined ahead of time.

Further information and the full range of features Umbraco 7.5.7 Hosting can be viewed here: http://hostforlife.eu/European-Umbraco-757-Hosting



ASP.NET Core 1.1 Hosting - HostForLIFE.eu :: How To Drag And Upload Multiple Image Files In ASP.NET?

clock January 25, 2017 08:20 by author Peter

In this tutorial, I will show you How To Drag And Upload Multiple Image Files In ASP.NET. First, I create a blank ASP.NET WebForm Project. And then, right click on the Project ==>select NuGet Package Manager ==> Select DropZone and Download it.

Design a WebForm having a file upload control.
    <head runat="server"> 
        <title></title> 
        <script src="scripts/dropzone/dropzone.min.js"></script> 
        <link href="scripts/dropzone/basic.min.css" rel="stylesheet" /> 
        <link href="scripts/dropzone/dropzone.css" rel="stylesheet" /> 
          
        <script src="scripts/ai.0.15.0-build58334.min.js"></script> 
    </head> 
    <body> 
        <form id="form1" runat="server" class="dropzone"> 
            <div> 
                <div class="fallback"> 
                    <asp:FileUpload ID="file" runat="server" AllowMultiple="true" /> 
                </div> 
            </div> 
        </form> 
    </body> 
    </html> 


Write the following code in the code behind(.cs) file.
    protected void Page_Load(object sender, EventArgs e) 
           { 
               foreach (string s in Request.Files) 
               { 
                   HttpPostedFile file = Request.Files[s]; 
     
                   int fileSizeInBytes = file.ContentLength; 
                   string fileName = file.FileName; 
                   string fileExtension = ""; 
     
                   if (!string.IsNullOrEmpty(fileName)) 
                       fileExtension = Path.GetExtension(fileName); 
     
                   // IMPORTANT! Make sure to validate uploaded file contents, size, etc. to prevent scripts being uploaded into your web app directory 
                   // string savedFileName = Path.Combine(@"..\Files\", Guid.NewGuid().ToString() + fileExtension); 
                  string savepath = Path.Combine(Request.PhysicalApplicationPath, "Files"); 
                   string savefile = Path.Combine(savepath, file.FileName); 
                   file.SaveAs(savefile); 
               } 
           } 


Run the project and select multiple files and drag to the box.

Drag and drop all the images to the box. It will upload the images and save them to your local folder (here in Files Folder).

HostForLIFE.eu ASP.NET Core 1.1 Hosting

European best, cheap and reliable ASP.NET hosting with instant activation. HostForLIFE.eu is #1 Recommended Windows and ASP.NET hosting in European Continent. With 99.99% Uptime Guaranteed of Relibility, Stability and Performace. HostForLIFE.eu security team is constantly monitoring the entire network for unusual behaviour. We deliver hosting solution including Shared hosting, Cloud hosting, Reseller hosting, Dedicated Servers, and IT as Service for companies of all size.

 



European ASP.NET Core Hosting - HostForLIFE.eu :: How to Add Localisation to ASP.NET Core Application

clock January 25, 2017 06:07 by author Scott

In this post I'll walk through the process of adding localisation to an ASP.NET Core application using the recommended approach with resx resource files.

Introduction to Localisation

Localisation in ASP.NET Core is broadly similar to the way it works in the ASP.NET 4.X. By default you would define a number of .resx resource files in your application, one for each culture you support. You then reference resources via a key, and depending on the current culture, the appropriate value is selected from the closest matching resource file.

While the concept of a .resx file per culture remains in ASP.NET Core, the way resources are used has changed quite significantly. In the previous version, when you added a .resx file to your solution, a designer file would be created, providing static strongly typed access to your resources through calls such as Resources.MyTitleString.

In ASP.NET Core, resources are accessed through two abstractions, IStringLocalizer and IStringLocalizer<T>, which are typically injected where needed via dependency injection. These interfaces have an indexer, that allows you to access resources by a string key. If no resource exists for the key (i.e. you haven't created an appropriate .resx file containing the key), then the key itself is used as the resource.

Consider the following example:

using Microsoft.AspNet.Mvc; 
using Microsoft.Extensions.Localization;

public class ExampleClass 
{
    private readonly IStringLocalizer<ExampleClass> _localizer;
    public ExampleClass(IStringLocalizer<ExampleClass> localizer)
    {
        _localizer = localizer;
    }

    public string GetLocalizedString()
    {
        return _localizer["My localized string"];
    }
}

In this example, calling GetLocalizedString() will cause the IStringLocalizer<T> to check the current culture, and see if we have an appropriate resource file for ExampleClass containing a resource with the name/key "My localized string". If it finds one, it returns the localised version, otherwise, it returns "My Localized string".

The idea behind this approach is to allow you to design your app from the beginning to use localisation, without having to do up front work to support it by creating the default/fallback .resx file. Instead, you can just write the default values, then add the resources in later.

Personally, I'm not sold on this approach - it makes me slightly twitchy to see all those magic strings around which are essentially keys into a dictionary. Any changes to the keys may have unintended consequences, as I'll show later in the post.

Adding localisation to your application

For now, I'm going to ignore that concern, and dive in using Microsoft's recommended approach. I've started from the default ASP.NET Core Web application without authentication.

The first step is to add the localisation services in your application. As we are building an MVC application, we'll also configure View localisation and DataAnnotations localisation. The localisation packages are already referenced indirectly by the Microsoft.AspNetCore.MVC package, so you should be able to add the services and middleware directly in your Startup class:

public void ConfigureServices(IServiceCollection services) 
{
    services.AddLocalization(opts => { opts.ResourcesPath = "Resources"; });

    services.AddMvc()
        .AddViewLocalization(
            LanguageViewLocationExpanderFormat.Suffix,
            opts => { opts.ResourcesPath = "Resources"; })
        .AddDataAnnotationsLocalization();
}

These services allow you to inject the IStringLocalizer service into your classes. They also allow you to have localised View files (so you can have Views with names like MyView.fr.cshtml) and inject the IViewLocalizer, to allow you to use localisation in your view files. Calling AddDataAnnotationsLocalizationconfigures the Validation attributes to retrieve resources via an IStringLocalizer.

The ResourcePath parameter on the Options object specifies the folder of our application in which resources can be found. So if the root of our application is found at ExampleProject, we have specified that our resources will be stored in the folder ExampleProject/Resources.

Configuring these classes is all that is required to allow you to use the localisation services in your application. However you will typically also need some way to select what the current culture is for a given request.

To do this, we use the RequestLocalizationMiddleware. This middleware uses a number of different providers to try and determine the current culture. To configure it with the default providers, we need to decide which cultures we support, and which is the default culture.

Note that the configuration example in the documentation didn't work for me, though the Localization.StarterWeb project they reference did, and is reproduced below.

public void ConfigureServices(IServiceCollection services) 
{
    // ... previous configuration not shown

    services.Configure<RequestLocalizationOptions>(
        opts =>
        {
            var supportedCultures = new[]
            {
                new CultureInfo("en-GB"),
                new CultureInfo("en-US"),
                new CultureInfo("en"),
                new CultureInfo("fr-FR"),
                new CultureInfo("fr"),
            };

            opts.DefaultRequestCulture = new RequestCulture("en-GB");
            // Formatting numbers, dates, etc.
            opts.SupportedCultures = supportedCultures;
            // UI strings that we have localized.
            opts.SupportedUICultures = supportedCultures;
        });
}

public void Configure(IApplicationBuilder app) 
{
    app.UseStaticFiles();
    var options = app.ApplicationServices.GetService<IOptions<RequestLocalizationOptions>>();    app.UseRequestLocalization(options.Value);

    app.UseMvc(routes =>
    {
        routes.MapRoute(
            name: "default",
            template: "{controller=Home}/{action=Index}/{id?}");
    });
}

Using localisation in your classes

We now have most of the pieces in place to start adding localisation to our application. We don't yet have a way for users to select which culture they want to use, but we'll come to that shortly. For now, lets look at how we go about retrieving a localised string.

Controllers and services

Whenever you want to access a localised string in your services or controllers, you can inject an IStringLocalizer<T> and use its indexer property. For example, imagine you want to localise a string in a controller:

public class HomeController: Controller 
{
    private readonly IStringLocalizer<HomeController> _localizer;

    public HomeController(IStringLocalizer<HomeController> localizer)
    {
        _localizer = localizer;
    }

    public IActionResult Index()
    {
        ViewData["MyTitle"] = _localizer["The localised title of my app!"];
        return View(new HomeViewModel());
    }
}

Calling _localizer[] will lookup the provided string based on the current culture, and the type HomeController. Assuming we have configured our application as discussed previously, the HomeController resides in the ExampleProject.Controllers namespace, and we are currently using the fr culture, then the localizer will look for either of the following resource files:

  • Resources/Controller.HomeController.fr.resx
  • Resources/Controller/HomeController.fr.resx

If a resource exists in one of these files with the key "The localised title of my app!" then it will be used, otherwise the key itself will be used as the resource. This means you don't need to add any resource files to get started with localisation - you can just use the default language string as your key and come back to add .resx files later.

Views

There are two kinds of localisation of views. As described previously, you can localise the whole view, duplicating it and editing as appropriate, and providing a culture suffix. This is useful if the views need to differ significantly between different cultures.

You can also localise strings in a similar way to that shown for the HomeController. Instead of an IStringLocalizer<T>, you inject an IViewLocalizer into the view. This handles HTML encoding a little differently, in that it allows you to store HTML in the resource and it won't be encoded before being output. Generally you'll want to avoid that however, and only localise strings, not HTML.

The IViewLocaliser uses the name of the View file to find the associated resources, so for the HomeController's Index.cshtml view, with the fr culture, the localiser will look for:

  • Resources/Views.Home.Index.fr.resx
  • Resources/Views/Home/Index.fr.resx

The IViewLocalizer is used in a similar way to IStringLocalizer<T> - pass in the string in the default language as the key for the resource:

@using Microsoft.AspNetCore.Mvc.Localization
@model AddingLocalization.ViewModels.HomeViewModel
@inject IViewLocalizer Localizer
@{
    ViewData["Title"] = Localizer["Home Page"];
}
<h2>@ViewData["MyTitle"]</h2> 

DataAnnotations

One final common area that needs localisation is DataAnnotations. These attributes can be used to provide validation, naming and UI hints of your models to the MVC infrastructure. When used, they provide a lot of additional declarative metadata to the MVC pipeline, allowing selection of appropriate controls for editing the property etc.

Error messages for DataAnnotation validation attributes all pass through an IStringLocalizer<T> if you configure your MVC services using AddDataAnnotationsLocalization(). As before, this allows you to specify the error message for an attribute in your default language in code, and use that as the key to other resources later.

public class HomeViewModel 
{
    [Required(ErrorMessage = "Required")]
    [EmailAddress(ErrorMessage = "The Email field is not a valid e-mail address")]
    [Display(Name = "Your Email")]
    public string Email { get; set; }
}

Here you can see we have three DataAnnotation attributes, two of which are ValidationAttributes, and the DisplayAttribute, which is not. The ErrorMessage specified for each ValidationAttribute is used as a key to lookup the appropriate resource using an IStringLocalizer<HomeViewModel>. Again, the files searched for will be something like:

  • Resources/ViewModels.HomeViewModel.fr.resx
  • Resources/ViewModels/HomeViewModel.fr.resx

A key thing to be aware of is that the DisplayAttribute is not localised using the IStringLocalizer<T>. This is far from ideal, but I'll address it in my next post on localisation.

Allowing users to select a culture

With all this localisation in place, the final piece of the puzzle is to actually allow users to select their culture. The RequestLocalizationMiddleware uses an extensible provider mechanism for choosing the current culture of a request, but it comes with three providers built in

  • QueryStringRequestCultureProvider
  • AcceptLanguageHeaderRequestCultureProvider
  • CookieRequestCultureProvider

These allow you to specify a culture in the querystring (e.g ?culture=fr-FR), via the Accept-Languageheader in a request, or via a cookie. Of the three approaches, using a cookie is the least intrusive, as it will obviously seamlessly be sent with every request, and does not require the user to set the Accept-Language header in their browser, or require adding to the querystring with every request.

Again, the Localization.StarterWeb sample project provides a handy implementation that shows how you can add a select box to the footer of your project to allow the user to set the language. Their choice is stored in a cookie, which is handled by the CookieRequestCultureProvider for each request. The provider then sets the CurrentCulture and CurrentUICulture of the thread for the request to the user's selection.

To add the selector to your application, create a partial view _SelectLanguagePartial.cshtml in the Shared folder of your Views:

@using System.Threading.Tasks
@using Microsoft.AspNetCore.Builder
@using Microsoft.AspNetCore.Localization
@using Microsoft.AspNetCore.Mvc.Localization
@using Microsoft.Extensions.Options

@inject IViewLocalizer Localizer
@inject IOptions<RequestLocalizationOptions> LocOptions

@{
    var requestCulture = Context.Features.Get<IRequestCultureFeature>();
    var cultureItems = LocOptions.Value.SupportedUICultures
        .Select(c => new SelectListItem { Value = c.Name, Text = c.DisplayName })
        .ToList();
}

<div title="@Localizer["Request culture provider:"] @requestCulture?.Provider?.GetType().Name"> 
    <form id="selectLanguage" asp-controller="Home"
          asp-action="SetLanguage" asp-route-returnUrl="@Context.Request.Path"
          method="post" class="form-horizontal" role="form">
        @Localizer["Language:"] <select name="culture"
                                        asp-for="@requestCulture.RequestCulture.UICulture.Name" asp-items="cultureItems"></select>
        <button type="submit" class="btn btn-default btn-xs">Save</button>

    </form>
</div> 

We want to display this partial on every page, so update the footer of your _Layout.cshtml to reference it:

<footer> 
    <div class="row">
        <div class="col-sm-6">
            <p>&copy; 2016 - Adding Localization</p>
        </div>
        <div class="col-sm-6 text-right">
            @await Html.PartialAsync("_SelectLanguagePartial")
        </div>
    </div>
</footer> 

Finally, we need to add the controller code to handle the user's selection. This currently maps to the SetLanguage action in the HomeController:

[HttpPost]
public IActionResult SetLanguage(string culture, string returnUrl) 
{
    Response.Cookies.Append(
        CookieRequestCultureProvider.DefaultCookieName,
        CookieRequestCultureProvider.MakeCookieValue(new RequestCulture(culture)),
        new CookieOptions { Expires = DateTimeOffset.UtcNow.AddYears(1) }
    );

    return LocalRedirect(returnUrl);
}

And that's it! If we fire up the home page of our application, you can see the culture selector in the bottom right corner. At this stage, I have not added any resource files, but if I trigger a validation error, you can see that the resource key is used for the resource itself:

My development flow is not interrupted by having to go and mess with resource files, I can just develop the application using the default language and add resx files later in development. If I later add appropriate resource files for the fr culture, and a user changes their culture via the selector, I can see the effect of localisation in the validation attributes and other localised strings:

As you can see, the validation attributes and page title are localised, but the label field 'Your Email' has not, as that is set in the DisplayAttribute.

Summary

In this post I showed how to add localisation to your ASP.NET Core application using the recommended approach of providing resources for the default language as keys, and only adding additional resources as required later.

In summary, the steps to localise your application are roughly as follows:

1. Add the required localisation services
2. Configure the localisation middleware and if necessary a culture provider

3. Inject IStringLocalizer<T> into your controllers and services to localise strings

4. Inject IViewLocalizer into your views to localise strings in views

5. Add resource files for non-default cultures

6. Add a mechanism for users to choose their culture



ASP.NET Core 1.1 Hosting - HostForLIFE.eu :: Implement .NET Core CSV WriterImplement .NET Core CSV Writer

clock January 18, 2017 07:56 by author Peter

Today, I will explain you about how to implement Generic CSV Writer which may take an input from any list and return a CSV string or write to a certain file, if specified. Although, this is a generic C# implementation and can be used in any .NET Framework supporting generics. Yet, we are going to discuss this with .NET Core. We are going to use .NET Core Console Application which is in continuation to Welcome to .NET Core Console Application.

Add new Class in DotNetCore.ConsoleApplication
We are going to add a new class CsvWriter in DotNetCore.ConsoleApplication.

  • Open existing solution in Visual Studio 2015.
  • Now, add a new class CsvWriter.cs.

        Open Add New Item Screen through DotNetCore.ConsoleApplication Context Menu of Common folder >> Add >> Class >> Installed >> .NET Core >> Class.

        Name it CsvWriter.cs.
        Click OK button.

  • Add CsvWriter implementation.


        Write<T> (IList<T> list, bool includeHeader = true).
        Creates and returns the generated CSV.
        Write<T> (IList<T> list, string fileName, bool includeHeader = true)
        Creates and returns the generated CSV and saves the generated CSV to the specified path.
        CreateCsvHeaderLine
        Creates CSV header line, if includeHeader is set true.
        CreateCsvLine<T>(T item, PropertyInfo[] properties).
        Creates a CSV line for the given type of the object.
        CreateCsvLine(IList<string> list).
        Creates a CSV line for the given list of the string by joining them, demarcated by comma.

        CreateCsvItem
        Adds the provided value item to the processed list, used to create CSV line.

        CreateCsvStringListItem
        Adds the provided string list as a single item to the processed list, which is used to create CSV line.

        CreateCsvStringArrayItem
        Adds the provided string array as a single item to the processed list, which is used to create CSV line.

        CreateCsvStringItem
        Adds the provided string value item to the processed list, used to create CSV line.

        ProcessStringEscapeSequence
        Processes the provided data to handle double quotes and comma value. If we do not apply escape sequences, they can corrupt the data.

        WriteFile
        Writes the generated CSV data to the file.

ConsoleApplication
    public class CsvWriter { 
        privateconst string DELIMITER = ","; 
     
        public string Write < T > (IList < T > list, bool includeHeader = true) { 
            StringBuildersb = new StringBuilder(); 
     
            Type type = typeof(T); 
     
            PropertyInfo[] properties = type.GetProperties(); 
     
            if (includeHeader) { 
                sb.AppendLine(this.CreateCsvHeaderLine(properties)); 
            } 
     
            foreach(var item in list) { 
                sb.AppendLine(this.CreateCsvLine(item, properties)); 
            } 
     
            returnsb.ToString(); 
        } 
     
        public string Write < T > (IList < T > list, string fileName, bool includeHeader = true) { 
            string csv = this.Write(list, includeHeader); 
     
            this.WriteFile(fileName, csv); 
     
            return csv; 
        } 
     
        private string CreateCsvHeaderLine(PropertyInfo[] properties) { 
            List < string > propertyValues = new List < string > (); 
     
            foreach(var prop in properties) { 
                stringstringformatString = string.Empty; 
                string value = prop.Name; 
     
                var attribute = prop.GetCustomAttribute(typeof(DisplayAttribute)); 
                if (attribute != null) { 
                    value = (attribute as DisplayAttribute).Name; 
                } 
     
                this.CreateCsvStringItem(propertyValues, value); 
            } 
     
            returnthis.CreateCsvLine(propertyValues); 
        } 
     
        private string CreateCsvLine < T > (T item, PropertyInfo[] properties) { 
            List < string > propertyValues = new List < string > (); 
     
            foreach(var prop in properties) { 
                stringstringformatString = string.Empty; 
                object value = prop.GetValue(item, null); 
     
                if (prop.PropertyType == typeof(string)) { 
                    this.CreateCsvStringItem(propertyValues, value); 
                } else if (prop.PropertyType == typeof(string[])) { 
                    this.CreateCsvStringArrayItem(propertyValues, value); 
                } else if (prop.PropertyType == typeof(List < string > )) { 
                    this.CreateCsvStringListItem(propertyValues, value); 
                } else { 
                    this.CreateCsvItem(propertyValues, value); 
                } 
            } 
     
            returnthis.CreateCsvLine(propertyValues); 
        } 
     
        private string CreateCsvLine(IList < string > list) { 
            returnstring.Join(CsvWriter.DELIMITER, list); 
        } 
     
        private void CreateCsvItem(List < string > propertyValues, object value) { 
            if (value != null) { 
                propertyValues.Add(value.ToString()); 
            } else { 
                propertyValues.Add(string.Empty); 
            } 
        } 
     
        private void CreateCsvStringListItem(List < string > propertyValues, object value) { 
            string formatString = "\"{0}\""; 
            if (value != null) { 
                value = this.CreateCsvLine((List < string > ) value); 
                propertyValues.Add(string.Format(formatString, this.ProcessStringEscapeSequence(value))); 
            } else { 
                propertyValues.Add(string.Empty); 
            } 
        } 
     
        private void CreateCsvStringArrayItem(List < string > propertyValues, object value) { 
            string formatString = "\"{0}\""; 
            if (value != null) { 
                value = this.CreateCsvLine(((string[]) value).ToList()); 
                propertyValues.Add(string.Format(formatString, this.ProcessStringEscapeSequence(value))); 
            } else { 
                propertyValues.Add(string.Empty); 
            } 
        } 
     
        private void CreateCsvStringItem(List < string > propertyValues, object value) { 
            string formatString = "\"{0}\""; 
            if (value != null) { 
                propertyValues.Add(string.Format(formatString, this.ProcessStringEscapeSequence(value))); 
            } else { 
                propertyValues.Add(string.Empty); 
            } 
        } 
     
        private string ProcessStringEscapeSequence(object value) { 
            returnvalue.ToString().Replace("\"", "\"\""); 
        } 
     
        public bool WriteFile(string fileName, string csv) { 
            boolfileCreated = false; 
     
            if (!string.IsNullOrWhiteSpace(fileName)) { 
                File.WriteAllText(fileName, csv); 
     
                fileCreated = true; 
            } 
     
            returnfileCreated; 
        } 
    } 


Add Test Model Class in DotNetCore.ConsoleApplication
We are going to add a new class TestVM in DotNetCore.ConsoleApplication.

  • Open the existing Solution in Visual Studio 2015
  • Now, add a new class TestVM.cs.

        Open Add New Item Screen through DotNetCore.ConsoleApplication Context Menu of Common folder >> Add >> Class >> Installed >> .NET Core >> Class.
        Name it TestVM.cs.
        Click OK button.

  • Add TestVM implementation.
  • Update Program.cs to initialize List<TestVM> with the dummy data and call CsvWriter.

    public class TestVM { 
        [Display(Name = "Test Id")] 
        publicintTestId { 
            get; 
            set; 
        } 
        [Display(Name = "Name")] 
        public string TestName { 
            get; 
            set; 
        } 
    } 
     
    public class Program { 
        public static void Main(string[] args) { 
            Console.WriteLine("Welcome to .NET Core Console Application"); 
            List < TestVM > tests = new List < TestVM > { 
                newTestVM { 
                    TestId = 1, TestName = "Bill Gates" 
                }, 
                newTestVM { 
                    TestId = 2, TestName = "Warren Buffett" 
                }, 
                newTestVM { 
                    TestId = 3, TestName = "Amancio Ortega" 
                }, 
                newTestVM { 
                    TestId = 4, TestName = "Carlos Slim Helu" 
                } 
            }; 
            stringstringfileName = string.Format("{0}\\test.csv", System.AppContext.BaseDirectory); 
            CsvWritercsvWriter = new CsvWriter(); 
            csvWriter.Write(tests, fileName, true); 
            Console.WriteLine("{0} has been created.", fileName); 
            Console.ReadKey(); 
        } 
    } 

Run Application in Debug Mode

  • Press F5 or Debug Menu >> Start Debugging or Start Console Application button on the toolbar to start the Application in the debugging mode. It will start an Application Console in the debug mode.
  • It will generate test.csv at given path. Therefore at C:\ASP.NET Core\CSV Writer\DotNetCore\ConsoleApplication.NetCore\bin\Debug\netcoreapp1.0.

HostForLIFE.eu ASP.NET Core 1.1 Hosting

European best, cheap and reliable ASP.NET hosting with instant activation. HostForLIFE.eu is #1 Recommended Windows and ASP.NET hosting in European Continent. With 99.99% Uptime Guaranteed of Relibility, Stability and Performace. HostForLIFE.eu security team is constantly monitoring the entire network for unusual behaviour. We deliver hosting solution including Shared hosting, Cloud hosting, Reseller hosting, Dedicated Servers, and IT as Service for companies of all size.



European ASP.NET Core Hosting - HostForLIFE.eu :: Dependency Injection in ASP.NET Core

clock January 16, 2017 11:12 by author Scott

One of the nice things that the new ASP.NET Core stack brings to the table, is Dependency Injection (DI) as a first-class citizen, right out of the box. DI is nothing new, even for ASP.NET, but in the earlier versions, it wasn't baked into the platform, and developers were forced to jump through hoops in order to enable it.

Let's look at the status quo and how things are changing for the better with the new DI system in ASP.NET Core...

Status quo

Because of the history of ASP.NET, the timelines and factoring of its different products, like WebForms, MVC, SignalR, Katana (OWIN) and Web API, they've each had their own way of doing DI. Some products have extensibility points that you can leverage in order to plug in an Inversion of Control (IoC) container:

  • Web API: System.Web.Http.Dependencies.IDependencyResolver and System.Web.Http.Dependencies.IDependencyScope
  • MVC: System.Web.Mvc.IDependencyResolver
  • SignalR: Microsoft.AspNet.SignalR.IDependencyResolver

While others, like WebForms and Katana, doesn't. Some will argue that the IDependencyResolver-type abstraction, which is essentially an implementation of the Service Locator pattern, is an anti-pattern and should be avoided, but that's a discussion for another day.

There are also other ways of achieving DI within some of the frameworks; MVC has IControllerFactory and IControllerActivator, Web API has IHttpControllerActivator etc. All of these are extensibility points that you can implement in order to leverage DI in your controllers.

Implementing these abstractions yourself isn't something that you typically want or should have to do. Most IoC containers have already implemented these adapters for you and ship them as NuGet packages. If we take Autofac as an example, some adapters include

  • Autofac.Mvc4
  • Autofac.Mvc5
  • Autofac.Owin
  • Autofac.WebApi
  • Autofac.WebApi2
  • Autofac.SignalR
  • Autofac.Web (WebForms)

As you can see, it quickly starts to add up - and this is just for a single container! Imagine if I'd compiled a list for the gazillion different IoC containers in the .NET space. Each of the adapters needs to be maintained, updated, versioned etc. That's a big burden on the adapter maintainers and the community in general.

On the consuming side of this, for a typical web application using MVC, SignalR and Web API, you'd end up needing three (or more) of these adapters, in order to leverage DI across the application.

The future

Even though a lot of ideas and code have been carried forward from Katana, ASP.NET Core is by all means a re-imagining, re-write, re-EVERYTHING of the entire, current ASP.NET stack. Hell, it's even triggered a re-jigging of the entire .NET (Core) platform and tooling. This means that it's a perfect time to bring DI into the platform itself, and make all components on top benefit of a single, unified way of doing DI.

Say hello to IServiceProvider! Even though the interface itself isn't new (it's been living in mscorlib under the System namespace since .NET 1.1), it's found new life in the ASP.NET Core DI system. It's also accompanied by a couple of new interfaces; IServiceCollection, which is essentially a builder for an IServiceProvider and IServiceScope, which is intended for resolving services within a specific lifetime scope, like per-request.

In order for things to Just Work™, out of the box, Microsoft have implemented a lightweight IoC container that ships with the ASP.NET Core hosting layer. It's in the Microsoft.Extensions.DependencyInjection NuGet package.

When ASP.NET Core is bootstrapped, it creates an instance of IServiceCollection and passes it to user code using the ConfigureServicesmethod of the Startup class:

public class Startup 
{
    public void ConfigureServices(IServiceCollection services)
    {
        // This method gets called by the runtime.
        // Use this method to add services to the container.

         // Adds the services MVC requires to run.
        services.AddMvc();

        // Add some custom services
        services.AddSingleton<ICache, Cache>();
        services.AddScoped<IDatabaseSession, DatabaseSession>();
    }

    // ...
}

In this method, you're free to add whatever services your application needs, and they will magically be available for constructor injection across the board. Different components in the stack also ship with extension methods to conveniently add the services the component needs to the collection, like AddMvc (shown above), AddCors, AddEntityFramework etc.

Now, it's important to note that the default implementation, living in Microsoft.Extensions.DependencyInjection is a deliberately lightweight, feature poor (is that a word?), fast, implementation of an IoC container. It has just the amount of features needed for the runtime/platform/framework to compose itself and run. A "lowest common denominator" feature set, if you will. If you want more advanced features, like many do, Microsoft actively encourages you to Bring Your Own Container (BYOC), or layer the functionality on top, which I've done with Scrutor. This brings us back to IoC container adapters.

If you want to use a third party container, you have to, like before, implement your own version of IServiceProvider (and its accompanying interfaces), or use an adapter that someone in the community has already provided. There are already several of these available, like

The difference this time is that you only need a single adapter to enable DI across the board. To plug in the adapter, you have to change the return type of the ConfigureServicesmethod to IServiceProvider and return the adapter implementation. By using StructureMap.Dnx as an example, let's look at our startup class again:

public class Startup 
{
    public IServiceProvider ConfigureServices(IServiceCollection services)
    {
        // This method gets called by the runtime.
        // Use this method to add services to the container.

        // Adds the services MVC requires to run.
        services.AddMvc();

        // Add some custom services
        services.AddSingleton<ICache, Cache>();
        services.AddScoped<IDatabaseSession, DatabaseSession>();

        // Create an instance of a StructureMap container.
        var container = new Container();

        // Here we can add stuff to container, using StructureMap-specific APIs...

        // Populate the StructureMap container with
        // services from the IServiceCollection.
        container.Populate(services);

        // Resolve the StructureMap-specific IServiceProvider
        // and return it to the runtime.
        return container.GetInstance<IServiceProvider>();
    }

    // ...
}

By doing this, all components will resolve its services from the StructureMap container, and you'll be able to utilize the full feature set of StructureMap, like awesome diagnostics, property injection, convention based registrations, profiles, decoration etc.

This post turned out longer than I expected, just to show a couple of lines of code at the end, but I thought it would be interesting to put everything in perspective and hopefully you did too. As you can see the DI story has been greatly simplified in the this new world, while still allowing you, as an application, library or framework developer, to utilize DI across the board, with minimal effort.

 

 



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