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European ASP.NET Core Hosting :: Working With AutoMapper

clock December 22, 2020 09:10 by author Peter

This article provides some guidelines on how to use AutoMapper in C#.
We have come across a lot of situations when we need to copy data from one object to another. Normally, we follow the below mentioned approach to achieve this. Let’s say we have two classes declared as below,

First Class:
    public class UserObject  
       {  
           public int Id;  
           public string Name;  
           public string Address;  
       }  

Second Class:
    public class UserAnotherObject  
    {  
        public int Id;  
        public string Name;  
        public string Address;  
    }
 

Now, if an object of the first class have some data in it and we want to copy that data to an object of the second class, we would be using the following approach for this:
    UserObject uObj = new UserObject();                         //an object of First Class  
               UserAnotherObject uAnotherObj = new UserAnotherObject();    //an object of Second   
      
               uAnotherObj.Id = uObj.Id;  
               uAnotherObj.Name = uObj.Name;  
               uAnotherObj.Address = uObj.Address;   


This is undoubtedly a tedious and repetitive task in case the object has a lot of properties.

Now, to overcome this task we can use a Nuget Package called the Auto-Mapper. Its working is quite simple to explain, in that it creates copy of one object into another but a bit automatically on the basis of Datatypes and names of the properties.

In order to use AutoMapper we would have to install it first from the Nuget Package Manager as pictorially explained below:

Step 1: Go to Manage NuGet Packages.. option in the project.
 

Step 2: Search and install AutoMapper to your project.

Step 3: Include the required Library on the page.
    using AutoMapper.Mappers;   

Now that this been done, we create a Mapper between the UserObject class and UserAnotherObject class. This will be done using the following line.

    AutoMapper.Mapper.CreateMap<UserObject, UserAnotherObject>();   

After creating this Mapper, let’s put some data into the object of the class UserObject that we made above,
    uObj.Id = 123;  
    uObj.Name = "Peter";  
    uObj.Address = "London";  


Now that we have the data, let’s copy the data from the object of UserObject class into the object of class UserAnotherObject using the AutoMapper that we just created above.
    uAnotherObj = AutoMapper.Mapper.Map<UserAnotherObject>(uObj);   

This copies the complete data from the uObj object to uAnotherObj object.

Note:
We need to keep it in mind that Auto Mapper copies data to properties in the target object with the same name as the properties name in the source object. The name should be the same but NOT CASE-SENSITIVE i.e. the name in source object can be “id” and that in the target object can be “ID”.



European ASP.NET Core Hosting :: ASP.NET Core 2.0 Structured Logging

clock December 15, 2020 07:28 by author Peter

In this tutorial, I will show you how to work with structured logging in ASP.NET Core and Serilog. Let's start with logging, add NuGet packages:
    Serilog.AspNetCore
    Serilog.Sinks.Literate
    Serilog.Sinks.Seq


In Program.cs, configure Serilog using its LoggerConfiguration class and storing an instance of ILogger (returned by CreateLogger) in Serilog’s static Log class.
    public static void Main(string[] args)  
          {  
              Log.Logger = new LoggerConfiguration()  
                          .WriteTo.LiterateConsole()  
                          .CreateLogger();  
      
             BuildWebHost(args).Run();  
          }  
      
          public static IWebHost BuildWebHost(string[] args) =>  
              WebHost.CreateDefaultBuilder(args)  
                  .UseStartup<Startup>()  
                  .UseSerilog()  
                  .Build();  


Using the ILogger is the same process as described in our previous post, however, with Serilog we can do structured logging.
    public async Task Invoke(HttpContext context)  
        {  
            var message = new  
            {  
                GreetingTo = "James Bond",  
                GreetingTime = "Morning",  
                GreetingType = "Good"  
            };  
            this.logger.LogInformation("Inoke executing {@message}", message);  
      
            await context.Response.WriteAsync("Hello Logging!");  
      
            this.logger.LogInformation(  
                "Inoke executed by {developer} at {time}", "Tahir", DateTime.Now);  
        }

Running the application will show messages in Console window.

Structured logging is a technique to include semantic information as part of the messages being logged. This helps ‘machine readability’ of these messages and tools can be written to analyze raw log messages and produce interesting information.

Serilog uses message template, similar to string.Format() in .NET. Few interesting aspects of template syntax are,
    Use {} to enclose property names e.g. {developer} in above solution. These will be stored as metadata and can be queried using structured data storage (e.g. Seq, Azure).
    Use @ to preserve object structure e.g. in solution above the anonymous object is serialized into JSON representation.

Enrichers
In Serilog, enrichers are used to attach information to every log event that can then be used by structured data storage (e.g. Seq, Azure) for viewing and filtering. A simple way to do this is by using .Enrich.WithProperty() when configuring Serilog,
    Log.Logger = new LoggerConfiguration()  
                               .Enrich.WithProperty("ApiVersion", "1.2.5000")  
                               .WriteTo.LiterateConsole()  
                               .CreateLogger();  
As we saw in the previous post, a category can be attached to the logged messages, which normally is the fully qualified name of the class. This information could be used by structured data storage (e.g. Seq, Azure). Serilog provides this mechanism by attaching Context via ForContext() method,
    Log.Logger = new LoggerConfiguration()  
                        .Enrich.WithProperty("ApiVersion", "1.2.5000")  
                        .WriteTo.LiterateConsole()  
                        .CreateLogger()  
                        .ForContext<HelloLoggingMiddleware>();  


Sinks
Sinks in Serilog refer to destination of log messages e.g. file, database or console (in our example). There are several sinks available (refer to link below). I’ll use Seq as an example sink to show how all the metadata we’ve added is available in a structured storage,
    Log.Logger = new LoggerConfiguration()  
                              .Enrich.WithProperty("ApiVersion", "1.2.5000")  
                              .WriteTo.LiterateConsole()  
                              .WriteTo.Seq("http://localhost:5341")  
                              .CreateLogger()  
                              .ForContext<HelloLoggingMiddleware>(); 

Notice how data we added via enricher, context and custom object appears as key/value pairs. This can now be used for filtering data and creating dashboards within Seq.



European ASP.NET Core Hosting :: How to Write Testable Code in .NET?

clock December 8, 2020 08:15 by author Peter

In this article, I give a brief introduction to writing testable code. Although I have described and used samples in the context of .NET, the high-level principles of writing testable code applies to most of the programming language.  
 
What is Testable Code?
Testable code refers to the loosely coupled code where code does not directly depend on internal/external dependencies, so we can easily replace the real dependencies (sometimes referred to as real service) with mock services in test cases. For example, if my code calls a method GetProductInfo() which is connecting to a real database, fetching the product information, and returning to the main method. To test my main method functionality without actually connecting to the real database, I can write a test that uses a mock service to get product data.
 
While it might seem a little confusing at this point, it is actually very simple when you see a working example of it.
 
Why is it important to write testable code?
Writing testable code is crucial, as it helps you to identify and resolve the potential problems/ bugs in the early development stage instead of getting issues in UAT or production when working with real services. Also, testing the fake services is fast compared to testing real services. For example, connecting to a real database is more time consuming than testing with fake data in mock service.
 
How to write testable code
Writing testable code is all about dependency management. If we are writing code using the SOLID principles, then our code will already be loosely coupled and in compliance with testing standards. While writing testable code, our main objective is to identify the dependencies and moving the instantiation of those dependencies outside of our code. When we create an object of the class using a new keyword inside the current class, then this class directly depends on the class whose object we are creating. For example, in the below code ProcessProduct class creating the object of DBService class. Hence DBService class is the dependency and ProcessProduct class depends directly on DBService.
    class Product  
        {  
            public int Id { get; set; }  
            public string Name { get; set; }  
            public string Category { get; set; }  
            public float Price { get; set; }  
      
        }  
        class ProcessProduct  
        {  
            public void DisplayProduct()  
            {  
                DBService dbService = new DBService();  
                var product = dBService.getProduct();  
                Console.WriteLine($" Product Name: { product.Name } Category: { product.Category } Price: { product.Price }");  
            }  
              
        }  
      
        class DBService  
        {  
            public Product getProduct() {  
                throw new NotImplementedException("Get product from database");  
            }  
        }  


To make this code loosely coupled, we will use a very popular design pattern called dependency injection. There are several ways to implement dependency injection which is itself a very wide topic. So to keep this article simple, I will use one of the ways to implement dependency injection-  Dependency injection using Constructor.
 
In this method, instead of creating the object of DBService inside ProcessProduct, we will inject the object through the constructor of the dependent class and save it in a private variable as shown in the below code:
    class Product  
    {  
        public int Id { get; set; }  
        public string Name { get; set; }  
        public string Category { get; set; }  
        public float Price { get; set; }  
      
    }  
    class ProcessProduct  
    {  
        private IDBservice _dbService;  
      
        public ProcessProduct(IDBservice dbService)  
        {  
            _dbService = dbService;  
        }  
        public void DisplayProduct()  
        {  
            var product = _dbService.getProduct();  
            Console.WriteLine($" Product Name: { product.Name } Category: { product.Category } Price: { product.Price }");  
        }  
          
    }  
      
    interface IDBservice {  
         Product getProduct();  
    }  
      
    class DBService : IDBservice  
    {  
        public Product getProduct() {  
            throw new NotImplementedException("Get product from database");  
        }  
    }  


We have also created an interface IDBService in the above example and declared the object of DBService using this interface. By using this interface, we allow any class’object that implements the IDBService interface to inject through the constructor.
 
Below is an example of passing a mock class object for testing.
    class ProcessProduct  
        {  
            private IDBservice _dbService;  
      
            public ProcessProduct(IDBservice dbService)  
            {  
                _dbService = dbService;  
            }  
            public void DisplayProduct()  
            {  
                var product = _dbService.getProduct();  
                Console.WriteLine($" Product Name: { product.Name } Category: { product.Category } Price:  { product.Price }");  
            }  
      
        }  
      
        interface IDBservice {  
            Product getProduct();  
        }  
      
        class MockDBService : IDBservice  
        {  
            public Product getProduct()  
            {  
                return new Product()  
                {  
                    Id = 2124,  
                    Name = "Eggs",  
                    Category = "Food",  
                    Price = 2.23m  
                };  
      
            }  
      
        }  
      
        class TestProcessProduct  
        {  
            void Test()  
            {  
                ProcessProduct processProduct = new ProcessProduct(new MockDBService());  
                processProduct.DisplayProduct();  
            }  
        }  


In this example, we want to test the ProcessProduct class to display product information without actually connecting to the real database. To achieve this, instead of injecting the DBService class object we are injecting the MockDBService class object. And because of dependency injection, we do not need to do any changes in the ProcessProduct class. Hence, this code is loosely coupled and testable.

 



European ASP.NET Core Hosting :: Remoting in .NET

clock November 24, 2020 08:30 by author Peter

Distributed computing is an integral part of almost every software development. Before .Net Remoting, DCOM was the most used method of developing distributed application on Microsoft platform. Because of object oriented architecture, .NET Remoting replaces DCOM as .Net framework replaces COM.
 
Benefits of Distributed Application Development
 
Fault Tolerance: Fault tolerance means that a system should be resilient when failures within the system occur.
 
Scalability: Scalability is the ability of a system to handle increased load with only an incremental change in performance.
 
Administration: Managing the system from one place.
 
In brief, .NET remoting is an architecture which enables communication between different application domains or processes using different transportation protocols, serialization formats, object lifetime schemes, and modes of object creation. Remote means any object which executes outside the application domain. The two processes can exist on the same computer or on two computers connected by a LAN or the Internet. This is called marshalling (This is the process of passing parameters from one context to another.), and there are two basic ways to marshal an object:
 
Marshal by value: the server creates a copy of the object passes the copy to the client.
 
Marshal by reference: the client creates a proxy for the object and then uses the proxy to access the object.
 
Comparison between .NET Remoting and Web services


Architecture

Remote objects are accessed thro channels. Channels are Transport protocols for passing the messages between Remote objects. A channel is an object that makes communication between a client and a remote object, across app domain boundaries. The .NET Framework implements two default channel classes, as follows:
 
HttpChannel: Implements a channel that uses the HTTP protocol. TcpChannel: Implements a channel that uses the TCP protocol (Transmission Control Protocol). Channel take stream of data and creates package for a transport protocol and sends to other machine. A simple architecture of .NET remoting is as in Fig 1.


As Fig.1 shows, Remoting system creates a proxy for the server object and a reference to the proxy will be returned to the client. When client calls a method, Remoting system sends request thro the channel to the server. Then client receives the response sent by the server process thro the proxy.
 
Example
Let us see a simple example which demonstrates .Net Remoting. In This example the Remoting object will send us the maximum of the two integer numbers sent.
Creating Remote Server and the Service classes on Machine 1: Please note for Remoting support your service (Remote object) should be derived from MarshalByRefObject.
    using System;  
    using System.Runtime.Remoting.Channels; //To support and handle Channel and channel sinks  
    using System.Runtime.Remoting;  
    using System.Runtime.Remoting.Channels.Http; //For HTTP channel  
    using System.IO;  
    namespace ServerApp {  
      public class RemotingServer {  
        public RemotingServer() {  
          //  
          // TODO: Add constructor logic here  
          //  
        }  
      }  
      //Service class  
      public class Service: MarshalByRefObject {  
        public void WriteMessage(int num1, int num2) {  
          Console.WriteLine(Math.Max(num1, num2));  
        }  
      }  
      //Server Class  
      public class Server {  
        public static void Main() {  
          HttpChannel channel = new HttpChannel(8001); //Create a new channel  
          ChannelServices.RegisterChannel(channel); //Register channel  
          RemotingConfiguration.RegisterWellKnownServiceType(typeof Service), "Service", WellKnownObjectMode.Singleton);  
        Console.WriteLine("Server ON at port number:8001");  
        Console.WriteLine("Please press enter to stop the server.");  
        Console.ReadLine();  
      }  
    }  
    }


Save the above file as ServerApp.cs. Create an executable by using Visual Studio.Net command prompt by, csc /r:system.runtime.remoting.dll /r:system.dll ServerApp.cs
 
A ServerApp.Exe will be generated in the Class folder.
 
Run the ServerApp.Exe will give below message on the console
 
Server ON at port number:8001
 
Please press enter to stop the server.
 
In order to check whether the HTTP channel is binded to the port, type http://localhost:8001/Service?WSDL in the browser. You should see a XML file describing the Service class.
 
Please note before running above URL on the browser your server (ServerApp.Exe should be running) should be ON.
 
Creating Proxy and the Client application on Machine 2
 
SoapSuds.exe is a utility which can be used for creating a proxy dll.
 
Type below command on Visual studio.Net command prompt.
 
soapsuds -url:http://< Machine Name where service is running>:8001/Service?WSDL -oa:Server.dll
 
This will generates a proxy dll by name Server.dll. This will be used to access remote object.
 
Client Code
    using System;  
    using System.Runtime.Remoting.Channels; //To support and handle Channel and channel sinks  
    using System.Runtime.Remoting;  
    using System.Runtime.Remoting.Channels.Http; //For HTTP channel  
    using System.IO;  
    using ServerApp;  
    namespace RemotingApp {  
      public class ClientApp {  
        public ClientApp() {}  
        public static void Main(string[] args) {  
          HttpChannel channel = new HttpChannel(8002); //Create a new channel  
          ChannelServices.RegisterChannel(channel); //Register the channel  
          //Create Service class object  
          Service svc = (Service) Activator.GetObject(typeof(Service), "http://<Machine name where Service running>:8001/Service"); //Localhost can be replaced by  
          //Pass Message  
          svc.WriteMessage(10, 20);  
        }  
      }  
    }


Save the above file as ClientApp.cs. Create an executable by using Visual Studio.Net command prompt by, csc /r:system.runtime.remoting.dll /r:system.dll ClientrApp.cs
 
A ClientApp.Exe will be generated in the Class folder. Run ClientApp.Exe , we can see the result on Running ServerApp.EXE command prompt.
 
In the same way we can implement it for TCP channel also.



ASP.NET Core Hosting - HostForLIFE.eu :: Progressive Retry for Network Calls

clock March 18, 2020 11:55 by author Peter

In today's mobile world, many calls across the internet or network could fail for many reasons. Some of the reasons could be the service is busy, the network is slow and many more. For these types of calls, it’s advisable to retry the call if there is an error. The current code base I am working on connects to Salesforce to retrieve and update data. Salesforce is one of those backend services that could experience these types of issues.

To help with these types of network issues, I have added a new method to my open-source code called ProgressiveRetry(). This method will try the call a given number of times. If there is an error, it will wait for a given milliseconds that increases with each error. Below is the code for this call.

    /// <summary> 
    /// Progressive retry for a function call. 
    /// </summary> 
    /// <param name="operation">The operation to perform.</param> 
    /// <param name="retryCount">The retry count (default 3).</param> 
    /// <param name="retryWaitMilliseconds">The retry wait milliseconds (default 100).</param> 
    /// <returns>System.Int32.</returns> 
    public static int ProgressiveRetry(Action operation, byte retryCount = 3,  
                                       int retryWaitMilliseconds = 100) 
    { 
        Encapsulation.TryValidateParam<ArgumentNullException>(operation != null); 
        Encapsulation.TryValidateParam<ArgumentOutOfRangeException>(retryCount > 0); 
        Encapsulation.TryValidateParam<ArgumentOutOfRangeException>(retryWaitMilliseconds > 0); 
      
        var attempts = 0; 
      
        do 
        { 
            try 
            { 
                attempts++; 
     
                 operation(); 
                return attempts; 
     
            } 
            catch (Exception ex) 
            { 
                if (attempts == retryCount) 
                { 
                    throw; 
                } 
      
                Debug.WriteLine(ex.GetAllMessages()); 
      
                Task.Delay(retryWaitMilliseconds * attempts).Wait(); 
                   } 
            } while (true); 
        } 
    } 


Here is example code on how to use ProgressiveRetry().
    var result = false; 
    var count = ExecutionHelper.ProgressiveRetry(() => 
    { 
        result = NetworkHelper.IsHostAvailable("wordpress.com"); 
    } 
    , retryCount: 3, retryWaitMilliseconds: 225); 
    Console.WriteLine($"Host available {result}. Tried call {count} times.");

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ASP.NET Core Hosting - HostForLIFE.eu :: Using Redis To Delay Execution In ASP.NET Core

clock March 3, 2020 11:07 by author Peter

Due to some business requirements, many operations should not begin to execute right away;  they should begin after some seconds, minutes or hours. For example, say there is a task, and it contains two steps. When we finish the first step, the second step should begin after 5 minutes.
 

How can we solve this problem?
Thread.Sleep() and Task.Delay() is a very easy solution that we can use. But it may block our applictions.
 
And in this article, I will introduce a solution based on keyspace notifications of Redis.
 
Here we will use expired events to do it, but this solution also has some limitations , because it may have a significant delay. That means that delay of execution may have smoe error, and will not be very accurate!
 
Let's take a look at this solution.
 
Set Up Redis
Keyspace notifications is a feature available since 2.8.0, so the version of Redis should not be less than 2.8.0.
 
We should modify an important configuration so that we can enable this feature.
    ############################# Event notification ############################## 
    
    # Redis can notify Pub/Sub clients about events happening in the key space. 
    # This feature is documented at http://redis.io/topics/notifications 
    # 
    # ......... 
    # 
    #  By default all notifications are disabled because most users don't need 
    #  this feature and the feature has some overhead. Note that if you don't 
    #  specify at least one of K or E, no events will be delivered. 
    notify-keyspace-events "" 


The default value of notify-keyspace-events is empty, we should modify it to Ex.
    notify-keyspace-events "Ex" 

Then we can startup the Redis server.

Create Project
Create a new ASP.NET Core Web API project and install CSRedisCore.
    <Project Sdk="Microsoft.NET.Sdk.Web"> 
     
      <PropertyGroup> 
        <TargetFramework>netcoreapp3.1</TargetFramework> 
      </PropertyGroup> 
     
      <ItemGroup> 
        <PackageReference Include="CSRedisCore" Version="3.4.1" /> 
      </ItemGroup> 
     
    </Project> 

Add an interface named ITaskServices and a class named TaskServices.
    public interface ITaskServices 
    { 
        void SubscribeToDo(string keyPrefix); 
     
        Task DoTaskAsync(); 
    } 
     
    public class TaskServices : ITaskServices 
    { 
        public async Task DoTaskAsync() 
        { 
            // do something here 
            // ... 
     
            // this operation should be done after some min or sec 
            var taskId = new Random().Next(1, 10000); 
            int sec = new Random().Next(1, 5); 
     
            await RedisHelper.SetAsync($"task:{taskId}", "1", sec); 
            await RedisHelper.SetAsync($"other:{taskId + 10000}", "1", sec); 
        } 
     
        public void SubscribeToDo(string keyPrefix) 
        { 
            RedisHelper.Subscribe( 
                ("[email protected]__:expired", arg => 
                    { 
                        var msg = arg.Body; 
                        Console.WriteLine($"recive {msg}"); 
                        if (msg.StartsWith(keyPrefix)) 
                        { 
                            // read the task id from expired key 
                            var val = msg.Substring(keyPrefix.Length); 
                            Console.WriteLine($"Redis + Subscribe {DateTime.Now.ToString("yyyy-MM-dd HH:mm:ss")} begin to do task {val}"); 
                        } 
                    }) 
            ); 
        } 
    } 


As you can see, we set a redis key with expiration. The expiration is the delay time.
 
For the delay execution, we can find it in SubscribeToDo method. It subscribes a channel named [email protected]__:expired.
 
When a key is expired, redis server will publish a message to this channel, and subscribers will receive it.
 
After reciving the notification, the client will begin to do the job.
 
Before the client receives the notification, the delay job will not be executed, so that it can help us to do the job for a delay.
 
Here is the entry of this operation.
    [ApiController] 
    [Route("api/tasks")] 
    public class TaskController : ControllerBase 
    { 
        private readonly ITaskServices _svc; 
     
        public TaskController(ITaskServices svc) 
        { 
            _svc = svc; 
        } 
     
        [HttpGet] 
        public async Task<string> Get() 
        { 
            await _svc.DoTaskAsync(); 
            System.Console.WriteLine("done here"); 
            return "done"; 
        } 
    } 


Put the subscriber to a BackgroundService, so that it can run in the background.
    public class SubscribeTaskBgTask : BackgroundService 
    { 
        private readonly ILogger _logger; 
        private readonly ITaskServices _taskServices; 
     
        public SubscribeTaskBgTask(ILoggerFactory loggerFactory, ITaskServices taskServices) 
        { 
            this._logger = loggerFactory.CreateLogger<RefreshCachingBgTask>(); 
            this._taskServices = taskServices; 
        } 
     
        protected override Task ExecuteAsync(CancellationToken stoppingToken) 
        { 
            stoppingToken.ThrowIfCancellationRequested(); 
     
            _taskServices.SubscribeToDo("task:"); 
     
            return Task.CompletedTask; 
        } 
    } 


At last, we should register the above services in startup class.
    public class Startup 
    { 
        // ... 
         
        public void ConfigureServices(IServiceCollection services) 
        { 
            var csredis = new CSRedis.CSRedisClient("127.0.0.1:6379"); 
            RedisHelper.Initialization(csredis); 
     
            services.AddSingleton<ITaskServices, TaskServices>(); 
            services.AddHostedService<SubscribeTaskBgTask>(); 
     
            services.AddControllers(); 
        } 
    } 


Here is the result after running this application.

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ASP.NET Core Hosting - HostForLIFE.eu :: How to Steps To Generate Excel Using EPPlus?

clock February 25, 2020 08:01 by author Peter

My work is to create an excel file, which will contain 3 fields: Address, Latitude and longitude.The user will upload an Address in an excel file and after reading the addresses from an excel file, I have to retrieve Latitude and longitude, using Bing MAP API and build another excel file, which can contain Addresses beside the Latitude and longitude of that address and download the new excel file to the user's end.

Create a MVC Application and add EPPLUS from NuGet package manager to your solution.

Now, Add the code to your .cshtml page.

<h2>Upload File</h2> 
 
sing (Html.BeginForm("Upload", "Home", null, FormMethod.Post, new { enctype = "multipart/form-data" })) 
  { 
      @Html.AntiForgeryToken() 
      @Html.ValidationSummary() 
 
      <div class="form-group"> 
          <input type="file" id="dataFile" name="upload" /> 
      </div> 
 
      <div class="form-group"> 
          <input type="submit" value="Upload" class="btn btn-default" /> 
      </div> 
 
       
  } 


And then, add the code, mentioned below to your controller.

[HttpPost] 
        public ActionResult Upload(HttpPostedFileBase upload) 
        { 
            if (ModelState.IsValid) 
            { 
                if (Path.GetExtension(upload.FileName) == ".xlsx") 
                { 
                    ExcelPackage package = new ExcelPackage(upload.InputStream); 
            //From This part we will read excel file 
                    DataTable dt = ExcelPackageExtensions.ToDataTable(package); 
 
 
                    DataTable dtExcel = new DataTable(); 
                    dtExcel.Columns.Add("Address", typeof(String)); 
                    dtExcel.Columns.Add("LAT", typeof(Double)); 
                    dtExcel.Columns.Add("LONG", typeof(Double)); 
 
                    List<Coordinates> lstCor = new List<Coordinates>(); 
                    for (int i = 0; i < dt.Rows.Count; i++) 
                    { 
                        //Fill the new data Table to generate new excel file 
                    } 
            //This method will generate new excel and download the same 
                    generateExcel(dtExcel);                  
                } 
            } 
            return View(); 
        } 


“ExcelPackageExtensions.ToDataTable(package)” for this create a new class with the name ExcelPackageExtensions and create a static method with the name “ToDataTable()”. The code is mentioned below.

public static class ExcelPackageExtensions 
    { 
        public static DataTable ToDataTable(this ExcelPackage package) 
        { 
            ExcelWorksheet workSheet = package.Workbook.Worksheets.First(); 
            DataTable table = new DataTable(); 
            foreach (var firstRowCell in workSheet.Cells[1, 1, 1, workSheet.Dimension.End.Column]) 
            { 
                table.Columns.Add(firstRowCell.Text); 
            } 
 
            for (var rowNumber = 2; rowNumber <= workSheet.Dimension.End.Row; rowNumber++) 
            { 
                var row = workSheet.Cells[rowNumber, 1, rowNumber, workSheet.Dimension.End.Column]; 
                var newRow = table.NewRow(); 
                foreach (var cell in row) 
                { 
                    newRow[cell.Start.Column - 1] = cell.Text; 
                } 
                table.Rows.Add(newRow); 
            } 
            return table; 
        } 
    } 

Now, add the code part to generate and download an Excel file.
[NonAction] 
        public void generateExcel(DataTable Dtvalue) 
        { 
            string excelpath = ""; 
            excelpath = @"C:\Excels\abc.xlsx";//Server.MapPath("~/UploadExcel/" + DateTime.UtcNow.Date.ToString() + ".xlsx"); 
            FileInfo finame = new FileInfo(excelpath); 
            if (System.IO.File.Exists(excelpath)) 
            { 
                System.IO.File.Delete(excelpath); 
            } 
            if (!System.IO.File.Exists(excelpath)) 
            { 
                ExcelPackage excel = new ExcelPackage(finame); 
                var sheetcreate = excel.Workbook.Worksheets.Add(DateTime.UtcNow.Date.ToString()); 
                if (Dtvalue.Rows.Count > 0) 
                { 
                    for (int i = 0; i < Dtvalue.Rows.Count; ) 
                    { 
                        sheetcreate.Cells[i + 1, 1].Value = Dtvalue.Rows[i][0].ToString(); 
                        sheetcreate.Cells[i + 1, 2].Value = Dtvalue.Rows[i][1].ToString(); 
                        sheetcreate.Cells[i + 1, 3].Value = Dtvalue.Rows[i][2].ToString(); 
                        i++; 
                    } 
                } 
                //sheetcreate.Cells[1, 1, 1, 25].Style.Font.Bold = true; 
                //excel.Save(); 
 
                var workSheet = excel.Workbook.Worksheets.Add("Sheet1"); 
                //workSheet.Cells[1, 1].LoadFromCollection(data, true); 
                using (var memoryStream = new MemoryStream()) 
                { 
                    Response.ContentType = "application/vnd.openxmlformats-officedocument.spreadsheetml.sheet"; 
                    Response.AddHeader("content-disposition", "attachment;  filename=Contact.xlsx"); 
                    excel.SaveAs(memoryStream); 
                    memoryStream.WriteTo(Response.OutputStream); 
                    Response.Flush(); 
                    Response.End(); 
                } 
            } 
 
        } 

HostForLIFE.eu ASP.NET Core Hosting

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European ASP.NET Core Hosting :: Error When Published ASP.NET Core? See Below Tips!

clock November 5, 2019 05:38 by author Scott

At the past few years, we have discussed about common error that you can find when published .NET Core, the most common error is 502.5 – process failure error.

Startup errors with ASP.NET Core don’t provide much information either, at least not in a production environment. Here are 7 tips for understanding and fixing those errors.

1. There are two types of startup errors.

There are unhandled exceptions originating outside of the Startup class, and exceptions from inside of Startup. These two error types can produce different behavior and may require different troubleshooting techniques.

2. ASP.NET Core will handle exceptions from inside the Startup class.

If code in the ConfigureServices or Configure methods throw an exception, the framework will catch the exception and continue execution.

Although the process continues to run after the exception, every incoming request will generate a 500 response with the message “An error occurred while starting the application”.

Two additional pieces of information about this behavior:

- If you want the process to fail in this scenario, call CaptureStartupErrors on the web host builder and pass the value false.

- In a production environment, the “error occurred” message is all the information you’ll see in a web browser. The framework follows the practice of not giving away error details in a response because error details might give an attacker too much information. You can change the environment setting using the environment variable ASPNETCORE_ENVIRONMENT, but see the next two tips first. You don’t have to change the entire environment to see more error details.

3. Set detailedErrors in code to see a stack trace.

The following bit of code allows for detailed error message, even in production, so use with caution.

public static IWebHostBuilder CreateWebHostBuilder(string[] args) =>
    WebHost.CreateDefaultBuilder(args)
           .CaptureStartupErrors(true) // the default
           .UseSetting("detailedErrors", "true")
           .UseStartup<Startup>();

4. Alternatively, set the ASPNETCORE_DETAILEDERRORS environment variable.

Set the value to true and you’ll also see a stack trace, even in production, so use with caution.

5. Unhandled exceptions outside of the Startup class will kill the process.

Perhaps you have code inside of Program.cs to run schema migrations or perform other initialization tasks which fail, or perhaps the application cannot bind to the desired ports. If you are running behind IIS, this is the scenario where you’ll see a generic 502.5 Process Failure error message.

These types of errors can be a bit more difficult to track down, but the following two tips should help.

6. For IIS, turn on standard output logging in web.config.

If you are carefully logging using other tools, you might be able to capture output there, too, but if all else fails, ASP.NET will write exception information to stdout by default. By turning the log flag to true, and creating the output directory, you’ll have a file with exception information and a stack trace inside to help track down the problem.

The following shows the web.config file created by dotnet publish and is typically the config file in use when hosting .NET Core in IIS. The attribute to change is the stdoutLogEnabled flag.

<system.webServer>
  <handlers>
    <add name="aspNetCore" path="*" verb="*" modules="AspNetCoreModule" resourceType="Unspecified" />

  </handlers>
  <aspNetCore processPath="dotnet" arguments=".\codes.dll"
              stdoutLogEnabled="true" stdoutLogFile=".\logs\stdout" />
</system.webServer>

Important: Make sure to create the logging output directory.

Important: Make sure to turn logging off after troubleshooting is complete.

7. Use the dotnet CLI to run the application on your server.

If you have access to the server, it is sometimes easier to go directly to the server and use dotnet to witness the exception in real time. There’s no need to turn on logging or set and unset environment variables.

Summary

Debugging startup errors in ASP.NET Core is a simple case of finding the exception. In many cases, #7 is the simplest approach that doesn’t require code or environment changes. FYI, we also have support latest ASP.NET Core on our hosting environment. Feel free to visit our site at https://www.hostforlife.eu.



European ASP.NET Core Hosting :: File Upload in Angular 7

clock September 20, 2019 10:52 by author Scott

In this article, we will see how to upload a file into the database using the Angular 7 app in an ASP.NET project. Let us create a new project in Visual Studio 2017. We are using ASP.NET Core 2 and Angular 7 for this project.

Prerequisites:

  • Node JS must be installed
  • Angular CLI must be installed
  • Basic knowledge of Angular

Let’s get started.

Create a new project and name it as FileUploadInAngular7

Select a new project with Angular in .NET Core and uncheck the configure HTTPS

Your project will be created. Left click on ClientApp and open it in file explorer

Type cmd as shown in the picture.

Type npm install in the cmd

Now it will take time and all the node_modules will be installed in the project.

Create a Web API controller as UploadController.

Add the following code in it.

using System.IO;
using System.Net.Http.Headers;
using Microsoft.AspNetCore.Hosting;
using Microsoft.AspNetCore.Mvc;
namespace FileUploadInAngular7.Controllers
{
    [Produces("application/json")]
    [Route("api/[controller]")]
    public class UploadController : Controller
    {
        private IHostingEnvironment _hostingEnvironment;
        public UploadController(IHostingEnvironment hostingEnvironment)
        {
            _hostingEnvironment = hostingEnvironment;
        }
        [HttpPost, DisableRequestSizeLimit]
        public ActionResult UploadFile()
        {
            try
            {
                var file = Request.Form.Files[0];
                string folderName = "Upload";
                string webRootPath = _hostingEnvironment.WebRootPath;
                string newPath = Path.Combine(webRootPath, folderName);
                if (!Directory.Exists(newPath))
                {
                    Directory.CreateDirectory(newPath);
                }
                if (file.Length > 0)
                {
                    string fileName = ContentDispositionHeaderValue.Parse(file.ContentDisposition).FileName.Trim('"');
                    string fullPath = Path.Combine(newPath, fileName);
                    using (var stream = new FileStream(fullPath, FileMode.Create))
                    {
                        file.CopyTo(stream);
                    }
                }
                return Json("Upload Successful.");
            }
            catch (System.Exception ex)
            {
                return Json("Upload Failed: " + ex.Message);
            }
        }
    }
}

Navigate to the following path and open both the files.

In home.component.html write the following code.

<h1>File Upload Using Angular 7 and ASP.NET Core Web API</h1>
<input #file type="file" multiple (change)="upload(file.files)" />
<br />
<span style="font-weight:bold;color:green;" *ngIf="progress > 0 && progress < 100">
  {{progress}}%
</span>
<span style="font-weight:bold;color:green;" *ngIf="message">
  {{message}}
</span>

In home.component.ts file write the following code in it.

import { Component, OnInit } from '@angular/core';
import { HttpClient, HttpRequest, HttpEventType, HttpResponse } from '@angular/common/http';
@Component({
  selector: 'app-home',
  templateUrl: './home.component.html',
})
export class HomeComponent {
  public progress: number;
  public message: string;
  constructor(private http: HttpClient) { }
  upload(files) {
    if (files.length === 0)
      return;
    const formData = new FormData();
    for (let file of files)
      formData.append(file.name, file);
    const uploadReq = new HttpRequest('POST', `api/upload`, formData, {
      reportProgress: true,
    });
    this.http.request(uploadReq).subscribe(event => {
      if (event.type === HttpEventType.UploadProgress)
        this.progress = Math.round(100 * event.loaded / event.total);
      else if (event.type === HttpEventType.Response)
        this.message = event.body.toString();
    });
  }
}

Run the project and you will see the following output.



European ASP.NET Core Hosting :: InProcess and OutOfProcess Hosting Model In ASP.NET Core

clock September 17, 2019 11:37 by author Scott

Once you finish developing an ASP.NET Core web application, you need to deploy it on a server so that end users can start using it. When it comes to deployment to IIS, ASP.NET Core offers two hosting models namely InProcess and OutOfProcess. In this article you learn about these hosting models and how to configure them.

When you deploy your web application to IIS, various requests to the application are handled by what is known as ASP.NET Core Module. Under default settings the hosting model for your application is InProcess. This means ASP.NET Core Module forwards the requests to IIS HTTP Server (IISHttpServer). The IIS HTTP Server is a server that runs in-process with IIS. This results in great performance as compared to Out Of Process model. In-process models bypasses built-in Kestrel web server of ASP.NET Core.

If you decide to use Out-Of-Process hosting model then IIS HTTP Server won't be used. Instead Kestrel web server is used to process your requests. So, ASP.NET Core Module forwards your requests to Kestrel web server. This communication is out-of-process communication and is therefore slower than the in-process model.

Now that you have some basic idea about the in-process and out-of-process hosting models let's see how to configure them.

In order to understand the hosting models discussed in this article you first need to create an ASP.NET Core web application using Visual Studio. So, go ahead and do so based on any of the web application project templates. Make sure to use ASP.NET Core version 2.2 or later.

Once you create the project, click on the Build > Publish menu and Web Deploy the output (or manually copy to IIS) to IIS. Once you finish deploying the application locate the web.config file generated during the deployment process. In this web.config you will find a section like this:

<system.webServer>
  <handlers>
    <add name="aspNetCore" path="*" verb="*"
modules="AspNetCoreModuleV2" />
  </handlers>
  <aspNetCore processPath="dotnet"
              arguments=".\MyWebApp.dll"  
              stdoutLogEnabled="false"
              stdoutLogFile=".\logs\stdout"
              hostingModel="inprocess" />
</system.webServer>

As you can see the <aspNetCore> tag has hostingModel attribute that is set to inprocess by default.

Now, run the application from the browser with this default setting in place and observe the HTTP headers. The following figure shows one such sample run of the application.

As you can see the Server is Microsoft IIS.

Now, change the hostingModel attribute from inprocess to outofprocess. Run the application again. This time you will get the following output:

As you can see the Server is now Kestrel indicating that Out-Of-Process model is active.

In the preceding example you change the hosting model in the web.config generated during the publish operation. You can also specify the hosting model in project's .csproj file. Consider the following markup from .csproj file that does that.

<PropertyGroup>
    <TargetFramework>netcoreapp2.2</TargetFramework>
    <AspNetCoreHostingModel>InProcess</AspNetCoreHostingModel>
</PropertyGroup>

The <AspNetCoreHostingModel> element sets the hosting model to InProcess. To set it to Out-Of-Process you need to set it like this:

<AspNetCoreHostingModel>OutOfProcess</AspNetCoreHostingModel>

Run the application with these settings and confirm whether you get the outcome as before.

That's it for now! Keep coding!!



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HostForLIFE.eu is European Windows Hosting Provider which focuses on Windows Platform only. We deliver on-demand hosting solutions including Shared hosting, Reseller Hosting, Cloud Hosting, Dedicated Servers, and IT as a Service for companies of all sizes.

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